ManagementStyles https://googlejuices.com Leadership and Management Updated Articles, Management Trending News, Marketing Articles, Social Media Marketing Strategies and Ideas Thu, 22 Aug 2019 13:10:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 https://i2.wp.com/googlejuices.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/cropped-rocket_2__.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 ManagementStyles https://googlejuices.com 32 32 108325208 Our favorite MTV VJs of all time https://googlejuices.com/our-favorite-mtv-vjs-of-all-time/ Thu, 22 Aug 2019 13:10:25 +0000 https://googlejuices.com/our-favorite-mtv-vjs-of-all-time/ On August 1, 1981, MTV broadcast “Video Killed the Radio Star” by The Buggles, a British band that was practically unheard-of prior to that day. Hosted by VJs, or video jockeys, MTV aired nonstop music [...]

The post Our favorite MTV VJs of all time appeared first on ManagementStyles.

]]>
On August 1, 1981, MTV broadcast “Video Killed the Radio Star” by The Buggles, a British band that was practically unheard-of prior to that day. Hosted by VJs, or video jockeys, MTV aired nonstop music videos, and the network quickly became a cultural sensation.

The VJs curated soundtracks of hit videos, interviewed musicians, and offered cultural commentary and social context to each video. From Nina Blackwood to “Downtown” Julie Brown, VJs through the years brought their own personalities and perspectives to the network that revolutionized how people experienced music.

Keep reading to reminisce on our favorite MTV VJs, ranked in chronological order from when they starred on the iconic TV channel.

Powered by WPeMatico

The post Our favorite MTV VJs of all time appeared first on ManagementStyles.

]]>
20817
Read the pitch deck that business travel startup Lola used to secure $37 million in funding https://googlejuices.com/read-the-pitch-deck-that-business-travel-startup-lola-used-to-secure-37-million-in-funding/ Thu, 22 Aug 2019 13:10:25 +0000 https://googlejuices.com/read-the-pitch-deck-that-business-travel-startup-lola-used-to-secure-37-million-in-funding/ Lola.com CEO Mike Volpe thinks business travel on the whole is just horrible – but he saw that as a big business opportunity. Lola focuses on making it easier for medium-sized companies to manage corporate [...]

The post Read the pitch deck that business travel startup Lola used to secure $37 million in funding appeared first on ManagementStyles.

]]>
Lola.com CEO Mike Volpe thinks business travel on the whole is just horrible – but he saw that as a big business opportunity.

Lola focuses on making it easier for medium-sized companies to manage corporate travel arrangements. Companies use the service to authorize employees to make travel-related purchases and set their own policies for those purchases. Employees then use the custom Lola experience to book work-related trips.

The Boston-based company is competing in an increasingly crowded space, but Volpe thinks Lola has another edge over rivals: its deal with American Express Global Business Travel, one of the largest players in the corporate travel market. American Express is using Lola to target medium-sized companies; its sales team markets Lola to those kinds of customers. And through that relationship, Lola gets access to special deals on airfare and hotels that are only available to American Express that it can offer its customers.

Corporate travel systems have traditionally been clunky, slow, and difficult to use for both employees and administrators alike, Volpe told Business Insider. From the company’s start in 2014, he designed Lola.com to be different. Co-founder Paul English, who was also a cofounder of Kayak, has experience in designing a popular and easy-to-use consumer travel sites, which helped inform the design of Lola.

Companies can get set up on Lola in less than an hour, according to Volpe, and once they’re on the system, their employees can book a trip in minutes. Lola offers 24/7 customer support that’s available within a minute, he said.

Investors are excited about Lola’s potential. In June of 2019, the company raised $37 million in a Series C funding round co-led by General Catalyst and Accel, according to PitchBook. Volpe expects the company to grow from about 75 employees to about 130 by the end of the year, all within its Boston headquarters.

To fully understand Lola’s strategy, Business Insider Prime has published the pitch deck the company used to raise its latest funding round. Simply enter your email address to receive a FREE download of the full deck!

Powered by WPeMatico

The post Read the pitch deck that business travel startup Lola used to secure $37 million in funding appeared first on ManagementStyles.

]]>
20816
How to turn an iPhone’s ‘Do Not Disturb While Driving’ mode on or off, or set it to enable automatically https://googlejuices.com/how-to-turn-an-iphones-do-not-disturb-while-driving-mode-on-or-off-or-set-it-to-enable-automatically/ Thu, 22 Aug 2019 13:10:23 +0000 https://googlejuices.com/how-to-turn-an-iphones-do-not-disturb-while-driving-mode-on-or-off-or-set-it-to-enable-automatically/ Your iPhone, like an Android, has a “driving mode.” It’s called Do Not Disturb While Driving, and it’s designed to reduce distractions and help you drive more safely. Your iPhone can start this mode automatically [...]

The post How to turn an iPhone’s ‘Do Not Disturb While Driving’ mode on or off, or set it to enable automatically appeared first on ManagementStyles.

]]>
Your iPhone, like an Android, has a “driving mode.” It’s called Do Not Disturb While Driving, and it’s designed to reduce distractions and help you drive more safely.

Your iPhone can start this mode automatically when it senses you’re driving, or you can turn it on manually when you get in the car. You can also turn it off or disable it at any time.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

iPhone Xs (From $999.99 at Best Buy)

What the iPhone’s driving mode does

When your iPhone is in Do Not Disturb While Driving mode, it reduces notifications, distractions, and screen activity, all to make your driving safer.

Driving mode reduces distractions by limiting notifications and blocking calls and texts while you drive.
Dave Johnson/Business Insider

For example, some of the things it does are:

  • Your iPhone screen stays dark and notifications are silenced, much like the usual Do Not Disturb mode.
  • If you get a text message, the phone sends an automatic reply letting the sender know you’re driving. The reply advises that if it’s an emergency, to reply with the word “urgent,” in which case you’ll get a notification about their message.
  • By default, calls from people on your Do Not Disturb exceptions list will ring through, and anyone who calls you twice in a row will ring through as well.
  • Lock screen notifications will appear, such as for turn-by-turn driving instructions.
  • A passenger can take control of the phone by tapping “I’m not driving.”

Read more: How to use Do Not Disturb on iPhone manually, or schedule it to activate at a specific time each day

How to turn on an iPhone’s driving mode automatically

You can allow your phone to start this mode automatically:

1. Start the Settings app.

2. Tap “Do Not Disturb.”

3. In the Do Not Disturb While Driving section, tap “Activate.”

4. Tap “When connected to Car Bluetooth” or “Automatically.”

You can use your car’s Bluetooth, or the motion of your car, to enable Do Not Disturb While Driving.
Dave Johnson/Business Insider

If your car has Bluetooth, it’s a good idea to choose that mode, since it’s more reliable. If you choose “Automatically,” you’ll find that your phone will often enter driving mode when you’re a passenger in other people’s cars.

How to turn on an iPhone’s driving mode manually

If you prefer, you can choose when to turn on driving mode. It’s easy to access with just a swipe, but first you have to add it to the Control Panel:

1. Start the Settings app.

2. Tap “Control Center.”

3. Tap “Customize Controls.”

4. In the More Controls section, tap “Do Not Disturb While Driving” to add it to the Include section.

Add Do Not Disturb While Driving to your Control Center so you can turn it on with a single swipe.
Dave Johnson/Business Insider

To enable driving mode manually, pull down the Control Center by swiping down from the top right of the screen ( iPhone X or later), or up from the bottom of the screen (iPhone 8 Plus or earlier), and then tap the icon of a car. This turns on Do Not Disturb While Driving.

The Do Not Disturb While Driving button looks like a car.
Dave Johnson/Business Insider

How to turn off an iPhone’s driving mode manually

There are two ways to turn off the Do Not Disturb feature while you’re driving:

  • Pull down the Control Center by swiping from the top right of the screen and tap the car icon again.
  • On the lock screen, tap the Do Not Disturb While Driving notification and then tap “I’m Not Driving.”
You can turn off Do Not Disturb While Driving mode with a tap to use your phone normally.
Dave Johnson/Business Insider

If your phone enters driving mode automatically and you want to disable that, do this:

1. Start the Settings app.

2. Tap “Do Not Disturb.”

3. In the Do Not Disturb While Driving section, tap “Activate.”

4. Tap “Manually.”

Powered by WPeMatico

The post How to turn an iPhone’s ‘Do Not Disturb While Driving’ mode on or off, or set it to enable automatically appeared first on ManagementStyles.

]]>
20814
How Algorithms Can Diversify the Startup Pool https://googlejuices.com/how-algorithms-can-diversify-the-startup-pool/ Thu, 22 Aug 2019 13:10:22 +0000 https://googlejuices.com/how-algorithms-can-diversify-the-startup-pool/ Data-driven approaches can help venture capital firms limit gender bias and make better, fairer investment decisions. advertisement Image courtesy of Greg Mably/theispot.com When pitching startups, men and women tend to have very different experiences in [...]

The post How Algorithms Can Diversify the Startup Pool appeared first on ManagementStyles.

]]>

Data-driven approaches can help venture capital firms limit gender bias and make better, fairer investment decisions.

When pitching startups, men and women tend to have very different experiences in being evaluated for funding.1 Consider these questions that a venture capital investor might pose to aspiring business owners:

To a male entrepreneur: “Tell us about your vision for this venture.”

To a female entrepreneur: “Tell us about your track record for this type of venture.”

Research shows that men are more likely to receive promotion-focused (risk-loving) questions from investors; for women, prevention-focused (risk-averse) inquiries are the norm.2 Investors also tend to disfavor stereotypically female behaviors, such as being soft-spoken and nurturing (versus bold and assertive), whether those behaviors are exhibited by men or women.3 But even when ventures are pitched in the same way, investors significantly prefer pitches made by men over those made by women.4

One possible explanation for these biases is the so-called cupcake stigma — the perception of women as less serious in their business ventures than the typical male entrepreneur.5 This stigma is reinforced by venture capital funding decisions, which are made mostly by men and thus based primarily on heuristics derived by men. Indeed, less than 10% of decision makers at VC firms are women and 74% of U.S. VC firms have no female investors.6 Despite evidence that suggests companies with female owners and leaders tend to outperform male-owned startups,7 the opportunities for female founders during the past decade have expanded from 1% to only 2.2% of VC funding.8 This scarcity of women in tech is exacerbated by perceptual biases related to gendered social norms and by the persistent structural challenges women face in fields related to science, technology, engineering, and math.

Some VC firms are starting to pay attention to how bias can affect funding decisions.

Powered by WPeMatico

The post How Algorithms Can Diversify the Startup Pool appeared first on ManagementStyles.

]]>
20812
Where Influencer Marketing Goes Wrong (and How to Fix It) https://googlejuices.com/where-influencer-marketing-goes-wrong-and-how-to-fix-it/ Thu, 22 Aug 2019 13:10:19 +0000 https://googlejuices.com/where-influencer-marketing-goes-wrong-and-how-to-fix-it/ Influencer marketing is a powerful tool for brands, but too often companies neglect a key component: good relationship management. advertisement For brands and businesses across numerous industries, gaining a foothold in social media increasingly means [...]

The post Where Influencer Marketing Goes Wrong (and How to Fix It) appeared first on ManagementStyles.

]]>

Influencer marketing is a powerful tool for brands, but too often companies neglect a key component: good relationship management.

For brands and businesses across numerous industries, gaining a foothold in social media increasingly means building campaigns around influencers. These are people who have engaged followings and know how to use that engagement to encourage followers to try certain brands. As Adweek puts it, “influencer marketing has become an essential aspect of most companies’ marketing programs.”

In fact, 86% of people surveyed for a 2019 benchmark report (including brand managers and people at marketing agencies) said they planned to spend marketing dollars on influencers this year. Also, 63% of businesses that have dedicated budgets specifically for influencer marketing plan to increase their budget over the next year. Some experts predict the influencer marketing industry will reach $10 billion by 2020 — and $2.38 billion will be spent on Instagram alone this year.

It’s clear why. Statistics compiled by the Digital Marketing Institute show that the majority of teenagers trust influencers more than traditional celebrities, and 40% of consumers have purchased a product directly after seeing it in an influencer marketing campaign on Instagram, YouTube, or Twitter. Taken together with the fact that estimates show on average businesses generate $6.50 in revenue for each $1 investment in influencer marketing, it’s easy to see how it is quickly becoming one of the most widely adopted customer acquisition methods for marketers.

As CEO of Julius, I regularly speak with brands about how to do influencer marketing most effectively. The answer boils down largely to management — and it’s where much of the industry is unprepared and has gone wrong for years.

Social media wasn’t developed for marketing, but it has become such an important way of reaching customers and audience that marketers have faced something of a Wild West scenario when trying to leverage social media in new ways. Often, influencer programs started with marketers simply asking people with large followings to push their products in tweets and Facebook posts, and hoping for the best. And because young people have often been savvier with social media, many marketing leaders put younger, less experienced workers in charge of coordinating with influencers.

This means that, all too often, the people dealing with influencers have much less experience managing people, and as a result, the brand fails to build strong relationships with the influencers.

In order to better manage influencer relationships, here are practical steps your organization can take.

Do Your Homework

Successful influencer marketing is not about finding just anyone who is “Twitter famous.” It begins with finding the right person — someone whose audience, capacity for storytelling, and personal brand align with the marketing campaign and messaging.

While conventional wisdom might hold that “bigger is better” when it comes to a social media following, in practice, “microinfluencers” — those with a follower range from 10,000 to 50,000 — can often have a greater impact when they’re selected for the right campaigns. They’re more likely to engage with followers and to have an audience specifically interested in topics and products they choose to highlight.

When you reach out to the right influencers, explain why you wanted them specifically. Show that you’ve taken the time to understand and consider what they’re all about. This starts off the relationship on the right foot.

Allow Creative Freedom

Social media influencers are not like actors hired to be spokespeople in ads. Influencers have impact because they produce authentic, engaging content. If they post parroted talking points about a product, they lose the authenticity that their followers count on. So it’s important to let them develop content that tells a story for their audience in their voice while highlighting your brand.

Putting too many restrictions in the content development process can hurt the influencer and brand relationship. Nearly 40% of influencers cite “overly restrictive content guidelines” as “one of the biggest mistakes brands and agencies make” in working with them, according to GDS Insights.

If your brand requires strict adherence to very specific messaging, it may be better to look for other internal or external campaign solutions, rather than influencers.

Keep Things Simple

Despite appearances that social media influencers may spend all their time having fun with friends, exercising, and enjoying nice things, the position requires hard work to be successful. To put together a living, most influencers have multiple clients — in fact, our 2019 State of Influencers survey showed that 46% had seven or more clients in the last 12 months. To maintain their audiences, most are constantly working to churn out engaging, meaningful content in varying formats and styles.

Like any freelance or contracted worker, the last thing they need is added friction and bureaucratic hassle when partnering with a new company. Making partnerships with them as smooth as possible — and ensuring they get paid promptly within deadlines — can make a huge difference.

Above all, keep in mind that influencers are human beings. When you delve into influencer marketing, you aren’t just buying your company space on a popular social feed. You’re creating an interpersonal connection with someone who has worked hard to build a community. When you honor that in the way you manage these relationships, you’re more likely to see big success.

Powered by WPeMatico

The post Where Influencer Marketing Goes Wrong (and How to Fix It) appeared first on ManagementStyles.

]]>
20810