ManagementStyles https://googlejuices.com Leadership and Management Updated Articles, Management Trending News, Marketing Articles, Social Media Marketing Strategies and Ideas Thu, 17 Oct 2019 13:17:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 https://i2.wp.com/googlejuices.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/cropped-rocket_2__.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 ManagementStyles https://googlejuices.com 32 32 108325208 Forget San Francisco: Here are 5 rising tech hubs across the US where housing is still affordable for software engineers https://googlejuices.com/forget-san-francisco-here-are-5-rising-tech-hubs-across-the-us-where-housing-is-still-affordable-for-software-engineers/ Thu, 17 Oct 2019 13:17:05 +0000 https://googlejuices.com/forget-san-francisco-here-are-5-rising-tech-hubs-across-the-us-where-housing-is-still-affordable-for-software-engineers/ A recent study by real-estate brokerage Redfin reveals five emerging tech hubs across the US where software engineers with a median income can still afford to buy a home. Redfin teamed up with LinkedIn to [...]

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  • A recent study by real-estate brokerage Redfin reveals five emerging tech hubs across the US where software engineers with a median income can still afford to buy a home.
  • Redfin teamed up with LinkedIn to gather the percentage of year-over-year job growth and the median income for software engineers in each hub.
  • The share of affordable homes in each tech hub was found using Redfin’s housing affordability dashboard. The study considers homes affordable if they cost less than 30% of the owner’s gross income.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.
  • Home prices in San Francisco are so outrageously high that even people with high-paying tech jobs are being priced out.  

    According to Zillow, the average price of a home in San Francisco is $1,351,500, making it one of the most expensive cities in the country. The median income for a software engineer in the Bay Area is $186,300. However, even a paycheck like that is no match for the area’s soaring housing prices.

    Read more: The salary you need to comfortably afford rent for a two-bedroom apartment in the 25 largest US cities, ranked

    Seattle-based real estate brokerage Redfin recently released a study that reveals five emerging tech hubs across the US where software engineers making a median salary can still afford to buy a home.

    By teaming up with LinkedIn, Redfin was able to gather both the job growth and median income for software engineers in each hub. The study only looked at metro areas with emerging tech scenes where the year-over-year job growth for software engineers was greater than 3% as of January 2019. 

    The share of affordable homes in each tech hub was found using Redfin’s housing affordability dashboard. The study considers homes affordable if they cost less than 30% of the owner’s gross income.

    Keep reading for the list of five rising tech hub with affordable housing, arranged in no particular order.

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    Deloitte’s demo day showcased how AI and data are key to keeping up with an unprecedented change in the tax industry https://googlejuices.com/deloittes-demo-day-showcased-how-ai-and-data-are-key-to-keeping-up-with-an-unprecedented-change-in-the-tax-industry/ Thu, 17 Oct 2019 13:17:04 +0000 https://googlejuices.com/deloittes-demo-day-showcased-how-ai-and-data-are-key-to-keeping-up-with-an-unprecedented-change-in-the-tax-industry/ A perfect storm driven by three forces is transforming the tax industry at an unprecedented pace, including a shifting global regulatory landscape, like the US Tax Reform and EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, technological innovation, [...]

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    A perfect storm driven by three forces is transforming the tax industry at an unprecedented pace, including a shifting global regulatory landscape, like the US Tax Reform and EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, technological innovation, and the difficulty of finding and retaining professionals.

    Deloitte

    Wikimedia Commons

    To help clients get ahead of these challenges, Deloitte embarked on a three-year digital transformation plan in 2018, dubbed Tax in 2020. On Tuesday, we attended a demo day to learn about the core technology tools that have sprung up from this initiative.

    Here are the key insights we gained about the tools.

    AI is entering the tax world to reduce errors in tax filing, free up professionals from repetitive tasks, and keep clients up to date on changing tax regulations. Deloitte has developed a tool, dubbed Cognitive Tax Insight, that leverages AI to analyze sales and use tax.

    The technology aims to help companies avoid overpaying tax — in any given year, tens of billions are overpaid by Deloitte clients, for instance — by scrutinizing transactions to recover unnecessary payments, not least due to errors. myInsights Signal Alert, on the other hand, uses AI to trawl through the internet to identify changes in tax regulation or news pertaining to specific tax topics that are relevant to a client. A third tool, dubbed SynTax, deploys natural language generation to simplify tax return processes.

    Data is crucial for companies to increase efficiency in their tax processes. However, data has also become significantly more diverse and unstructured than ever. The impact of this is that companies have to spend more time and resources collecting, cleaning, and organizing their data to make it useful and understandable for analysis and reporting.

    Deloitte has developed a data collection and wrangling platform to retrieve raw data and convert it into information that can generate meaningful insights. According to Deloitte, the platform is able to save 85% more time when used, compared with conventional approaches.

    Deloitte’s demo day illustrates the growing digitization of tax processes — a boon for fintechs that leverage it accordingly. According to the firm, in a survey of 2,000 clients, 30-40% think there’s more work to be done when it comes to tax-related processes today. This growing complexity, coupled with the lack of tax professionals to serve the demand, provides a heightened role for technology. For fintechs, this presents a number of opportunities to tap into.

    One such opportunity is to integrate tax-related tools within their product suite, which could be especially valuable for small- and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) and freelancers that may not have the resources for dedicated systems. Starling is one such example: Its app integrates with accounting tools like Xero to help SMBs that use its business accounts meet their tax reporting requirements more seamlessly. With heavyweights like Deloitte also servicing the space, smaller players could look to follow in Starling’s footsteps, either through marketplaces or bespoke integrations with specialist tax technology providers, to keep up.

    Want to read more stories like this one? Here’s how to get access:

    1. Join thousands of top companies worldwide who trust Business Insider Intelligence for their competitive research needs. >> Inquire About Our Enterprise Memberships
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    3. Current subscribers can log in to read the briefing here.

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    Quick thinking, diplomacy, and a willingness to snorkel with pigs: Celebrity bodyguards explain what it takes to protect the stars and billionaires https://googlejuices.com/quick-thinking-diplomacy-and-a-willingness-to-snorkel-with-pigs-celebrity-bodyguards-explain-what-it-takes-to-protect-the-stars-and-billionaires/ Thu, 17 Oct 2019 13:17:03 +0000 https://googlejuices.com/quick-thinking-diplomacy-and-a-willingness-to-snorkel-with-pigs-celebrity-bodyguards-explain-what-it-takes-to-protect-the-stars-and-billionaires/ 1. Communication and diplomacy are more important than size. Intelligent Protection’s Polly Wilton on a job in the Bahamas in July.Courtesy of Polly Wilton Contrary to popular belief, size isn’t key to being a good [...]

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    1. Communication and diplomacy are more important than size.

    Polly Wilton Intelligent Protection
    Intelligent Protection’s Polly Wilton on a job in the Bahamas in July.
    Courtesy of Polly Wilton

    Contrary to popular belief, size isn’t key to being a good bodyguard, all three experts told Business Insider.

    Instead, people with “softer skills” such as communication and diplomacy make more effective bodyguards, Bomberg said. Multiple languages also help, given the company’s international work — some of the firm’s employees speak four languages.

    “Some people in the industry make the mistake of assessing the quality of someone by the figure on the scales,” said Graeme Dyson, a bodyguard and manager at Intelligent Protection who previously worked as a counter-terror police officer.

    “This doesn’t happen with other professions — no one judges their doctor’s skills by how tall they are or what they weigh and this should be the same for a professional bodyguard.”

    “Celebrities in particular like to attract attention to themselves by overtly using bodyguards like these,” he added. “However, when it all goes wrong, and they need a different level of protection and professionalism, it is companies like Intelligent Protection that they come to for help and advice.”

    2. Flexibility is key, even if it means you end up in weird situations — sometimes involving pigs.

    Exuma pig
    Officers had to swim with Exuma pigs on a recent job.
    Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty

    Protection tasks can be “frustrating,” as officers spend hours planning an event only for everything to change at the last minute, Dyson said.

    “Some of the clients you look after lead very chaotic lives and you need to be able to adjust to not being in control of where you are, who you are with, how long you’re staying and where you’re going next,” he said.

    “Flexibility, adaptability and being able to think on your feet” are key, he added. For example, he said, a Middle Eastern royal ruined detailed security plans for a restaurant meal by changing his booking at the last minute, and bodyguards had to adapt quickly.

    One training exercise two years ago involved going undercover and swimming with pigs in Exuma, a collection of islands in the Bahamas where two James Bond movies were shot.

    Bodyguards had to pose as tourists — to practise protecting their clients without their realizing — and ended up swimming with pigs and sharks, traveling by powerboat and jet ski, and even snorkeling to stay incognito.

    “It doesn’t get much more surreal than that,” Polly Wilton, another bodyguard who was on the trip, told Business Insider.

    3. Clients’ lifestyles are going to be like nothing you’ve seen before.

    Miranda Kerr Cannes
    Intelligent Protection worked with Miranda Kerr at Magnum’s event at the Cannes Film Festival in 2015.
    Andreas Rentz/Getty

    Being a bodyguard to billionaires, royals and celebrities offers a glimpse into their lifestyles — for better and for worse.

    “You have an insight into how multi-million-pound companies work and the influential circles they move in,” said Wilton, who served in the British Army before joining Intelligent Protection.

    “When protecting UHNWI [ultra-high net worth individuals] you have exposure to their unique lifestyles and the vast difference to what normality is to them.”

    Some bodyguards might “get used to going to good restaurants and eating expensive food, staying in the best hotels,” Dyson said. “Some begin to think that is their lifestyle and not the clients’, and try and do the same thing when they are not working and bankrupt themselves.”

    “I have seen a few people ruined by trying to keep up with a client who is financially completely out of their league,” he added.

    4. Some clients might be harder to deal with than others.

    bodyguard
    A scene from the BBC/Netflix show “Bodyguard,” in which Richard Madden’s character protects the UK Home Secretary.
    Netflix

    Bodyguards also have to get used to client’s whims and behavior.

    Some are “shockingly horrible,” Dyson said. When one former client got into a bad mood, he would fire “people on the spot because he didn’t like their socks,” he said.

    But “others are really considerate and come across as very genuine, decent people no matter their fame or wealth,” he added.

    The job also has its perks from time to time: Dyson ended up as an extra on the “Sherlock” TV show while looking after Cumberbatch and had dinner with “Monty Python” cast members on another job, he said.

    You can see Dyson behind Cumberbatch in the bottom-right photo here.

    5. Men aren’t necessarily more effective bodyguards than women.

    Polly Wilton NATO
    Polly Wilton working at the NATO Ambassador’s residence in Kabul in 2009, as part of the Royal Military Police at the time.
    Courtesy of Polly Wilton

    Protection services are still a “male-dominated industry,” Wilton said, describing it as a reality perpetuated by “the old cliché that men are stronger than women.”

    But the demand for female bodyguards has been increasing over the past few years: The Duchess of Cambridge, David Cameron, Tony Blair, JK Rowling, and Beyoncé all have female bodyguards, author Robert Ryan wrote in The Times of London in 2017.

    “UHNWI are becoming more security wary,” Wilton said. “With the increased use of social media, them and their families are more exposed.”

    In cases like this, female bodyguards have an advantage because they look less imposing and therefore draw less attention to those being protected, Wilton said.

    Bodyguards with large, imposing figures “actually draw attention to the clients and put them at more stress and risk,” bodyguard Lisa Baldwin told The Times. “In a playground I just look like a friend or a nanny, especially if I dress down.”

    Lone females and clients with children tend to request female bodyguards in their protection teams, Wilton said. Baldwin also noted that Muslim families who prefer that women not mix too closely to men may also prefer female officers.

    6. Always be prepared for attacks and disasters. They can happen to anyone.

    Graeme Dyson bodyguard in Paris
    Graeme Dyson working in Paris.
    Courtesy of Graeme Dyson

    Disasters can happen to anyone, so it’s important for normal people to be prepared and vigilant too, the bodyguards said.

    “The world is changing,” Bomberg said. “The rise of global terror groups such as ISIS has meant that you are not even safe on a beach vacation in the Mediterranean, drinking coffee in Paris or at a concert in London.”

    Dyson added: “Everyone should have a basic understanding of first aid, be able to perform CPR, control bleeding and apply a tourniquet.”

    “Just those basics alone could save your life, the life of a loved one or a stranger in the case of a traffic accident, an accident at work or a terrorist incident,” he said.

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    Winning With AI: An Interactive Discussion https://googlejuices.com/winning-with-ai-an-interactive-discussion/ Thu, 17 Oct 2019 13:17:02 +0000 https://googlejuices.com/winning-with-ai-an-interactive-discussion/ Gain actionable insights from peers and AI experts during a live Twitter chat. advertisement On Oct. 15, 2019, MIT Sloan Management Review and Boston Consulting Group published their most recent collaborative research report examining the [...]

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    Gain actionable insights from peers and AI experts during a live Twitter chat.

    On Oct. 15, 2019, MIT Sloan Management Review and Boston Consulting Group published their most recent collaborative research report examining the corporate adoption of and impact from artificial intelligence. We invite you to join us on Twitter for an engaging discussion of some of the themes we address in the report.

    Please join report writer Julia Kirby (@juliakirby) and Martin Reeves (@martinkreeves), global director of the BCG Henderson Institute, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019, at 11 a.m. EDT/8 a.m. PDT, to join what promises to be a fast-paced and informative conversation.

    To participate, head over to MIT Sloan Management Review’s Twitter feed at the chat start time, or search Twitter for the hashtag #MITSMRChat to follow along.

    The questions we’ll discuss include:

    • Has your personal understanding of AI changed in the past year? How?
    • Do you see AI as an opportunity or risk for companies (or both)? Why?
    • Does your company use AI? How? Has it been successful?
    • What are the two to three main success factors for AI implementation?
    • What groups/functions in an organization should lead AI efforts?

    We hope to see you there.

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    The Real Secret to My Social Media Success https://googlejuices.com/the-real-secret-to-my-social-media-success/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 14:34:32 +0000 https://googlejuices.com/the-real-secret-to-my-social-media-success/ The other day I was recording a podcast episode with my co-host Eric Siu and he wanted to discuss something in particular. He wanted to talk about how I got to 62,000 Instagram followers in [...]

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    The other day I was recording a podcast episode with my co-host Eric Siu and he wanted to discuss something in particular.

    He wanted to talk about how I got to 62,000 Instagram followers in a very short period of time and without spending any money on ads or marketing.

    Eric is a great marketer as well, and when it comes to social media, he spends much more time than me on it and he even has people at his ad agency dedicated to helping him grow his personal brand online.

    And of writing this post, he has 4,056 followers.

    It’s not just with Instagram either, I beat him on all platforms.

    Heck, he even does something that I don’t do, which is smart… he continually pays for advice. For example, he had his team jump on an hour call with Gary Vaynerchuk’s social media team so they could learn from them and grow his brand faster.

    So, what’s the secret to my success?

    Well, before I get into it, let me first start off by saying I love Eric to death and the point of this post isn’t to pick on him or talk crap… more so, I have a point to make and you’ll see it in a bit below.

    Is it the fundamentals?

    Everyone talks about strategies to grow your social following… from going live and posting frequently or talking about the type of content you should post and what you shouldn’t do.

    I could even tell you that you need to respond to every comment and build up a relationship with your followers, which will help you grow your following and brand.

    And although all of this is true, I dare you to try the fundamentals or the strategies that every marketing guru talks about doing. If you do, I bet this will happen…

    It will be a lot of work and, if you are lucky, in the next 30 days you may get 10% more followers.

    Sure, some of you will get much more growth, but you’ll find that you can’t always replicate it and it won’t be consistent.

    So, what is it then?

    Is it luck?

    Luck is part of some people’s success, but not most. The problem with luck is it doesn’t teach you much and it isn’t easy to replicate.

    The reality is, some people will just get lucky and have tons of traction.

    In other words, luck isn’t the secret. But if you do want to get “luckier”, then you can always become an early adopter which helps a bit.

    How early is early?

    When you jump onto a social network when it’s new, it’s easier to grow and become popular.

    For example, I got to over 30,000 Twitter followers extremely fast when Twitter first came out.

    At that time, I wasn’t as well known… it happened because of a few reasons:

    1. Social algorithms are favorable early on – algorithms are typically favorable and most people will see your content. There aren’t many restrictions, hence it’s easier to grow. After a social network becomes popular, algorithms tighten up.
    2. Algorithms are easier to game early on – when you are early, you can use a lot of hacks to grow faster. For example, on Twitter, I would just follow tons of people a day and unfollow anyone who didn’t follow me back.
    3. First movers’ advantage – social networks want more users, that’s what they need to succeed. In the early stages of any platform, they want to help you gain more of a following so you will keep using their platform.

    But here is the thing: even though being an early adopter helps, it’s not the secret to my success.

    Just look at Instagram, I am really late to the game. But I started growing fast just this year as that is when we really started.

    If you can get in early, you should do so, assuming you have the time to invest. For example, this is the time to get in on Tiktok.

    When you get in early, there is always the chance that the social network may end up flopping. But if it does take off, you’ll be ahead of your competition.

    So what did I do?

    Here was the secret to my growth… and it still works today. Eric Siu is even doing it with me right now.

    It’s piggybacking on brands that are already popular.

    When I first started, no one knew who I was. And I’m not saying everyone knows who I am today… by no means do I have a large brand like Tony Robbins.

    What I did early on in my career was piggyback off of other popular brands.

    For example, I hit up Pete Cashmore from Mashable, Michael Arrington from TechCrunch, Arianna Huffington from Huffington Post, and so many other popular sites like ReadWriteWeb, Business Insider, Gawker Media, and GigaOm to name just a few.

    I know some of them don’t exist anymore, but back then they were extremely popular. Anyone who was in tech, and even some who weren’t, knew about each of those sites.

    So, when I got started as a marketer, I hit up all of those sites and offered all of them free marketing in exchange for promoting my brand and adding “Marketing done by Neil Patel” or “Marketing done by Pronet”, which was my ad agency back then.

    Just look at the image above. TechCrunch used to link to my site on every page of their site… forget rich anchor text, it really is all about branding.

    The hardest part is, I had to email and message these influencers dozens of times just to convince them to let me help them for free. And a lot of them ignored me or didn’t accept my offer.

    But of a few said yes.

    Pete from Mashable was one of the first to say yes. Once his traffic and rankings skyrocketed, his competition hit me up. Especially TechCrunch.

    What was funny, though, is that I was constantly emailing TechCrunch and didn’t hear back. 6 months from my first email, they eventually accepted my offer.

    I made a deal with Michael Arrington at the time in which once I boosted his traffic, he would add a logo that I did marketing for him, which you saw above.

    In addition to that, he would tell all of his venture capital friends what I did for him and share the results (so hopefully they would share it with their portfolio companies, which would help me make money) and write a blog post about me.

    He didn’t end up writing the blog post, which is fine, but he did the other two.

    When he sent out emails to VCs showing a Google Analytics graph of his traffic growing at a rapid pace, I quickly got inundated with inquiries about my marketing services.

    In addition to that, I was building up my brand… and my social media following. I was gaining “social clout” because I was doing good work for influencers.

    One could argue that boosting traffic for someone like TechCrunch by 30% is worth millions and I should have charged for my services. Although I spent countless time doing free work, I wouldn’t trade it for any single dollar as it is what made me and helped build up my reputation.

    And I didn’t stop there. Even today, I try to associate myself with other popular brands. Just like how I was lucky enough to work with Robert Herjavec, who has a popular TV show in the US along with Mark Cuban…

    Here’s how many visitors I was getting for my name “Neil Patel” on a monthly basis before I started working with Robert.

    And this is how many visitors I get for my name on a monthly basis a few months after I worked with Robert.

    That’s a 37.84% increase in a matter of months!

    By piggybacking off of popular brands, it doesn’t just help my website traffic but also helps to grow my social media following as well.

    Just like as you can see below with my Instagram growth…

    Now it isn’t just me who can do this, anyone can.

    How can you piggyback off of other brands?

    Just like how I piggybacked off of brands like TechCrunch, Eric is doing something similar to me at the moment.

    We have a podcast that generates over 1 million downloads a month.

    Eric’s had a podcast for years, but the one he has with me has more than 10x the listeners. This has helped him grow his brand a lot over the last year.

    Let’s just look at the data. According to Eric, due to the podcast, he has signed up 6 clients, which has generated 540,000 dollars in annual revenue.

    Now when he goes to tech conferences, 3 to 4 people tend to come up to him and mention how they love Marketing School and his work. In addition to that, it has been easier for Eric to set up meetings (people respond back to him more now), and he is also getting advisory shares in companies due to his growing brand. And the best part is, he is getting more paid speaking gigs for up to $10,000 a pop because of the podcast.

    The data shows it was a good move by Eric for partnering up with me. He pushed me to do a podcast years ago and I told him no because I was too lazy. He didn’t give up though. Eventually, he got me to say yes and flew to my house in Las Vegas to record our first episode.

    He did all of the work and it has been a great mutual relationship as doing this podcast has also helped grow my brand at the same time.

    Now you are probably thinking, why isn’t his follower count growing fast enough?

    Well, he needs to do what he is doing with me with a few more influencers to really put fuel to the fire. Just like how I didn’t only piggyback off of TechCrunch… at one point the Gawker Media network was linking to me on every page of their sites, which was seen by over 100 million unique people per month.

    That really gets your brand out there!

    Another example is Brian Dean from Backlinko as he did something similar with me back in the day. Years ago I approached him to write a detailed guide on link building with him and he also created videos that were on my old marketing blog Quick Sprout, which helped him grow his brand.

    I can’t take credit for “making” Eric or Brian successful. They would have done well without me… and in the grand scheme of things, I really didn’t do much for either of them.

    It’s like saying TechCrunch made the Neil Patel brand. Of course, it helped, and helped a lot… but one partnership won’t make or break you.

    And if I didn’t continually blog, create videos, speak at events, or do any of the other stuff that I did, the TechCrunch partnership wouldn’t have been as effective.

    Eric and Brian would have grown their brand in other ways because their work stands for itself, hence they would have been successful on their own. I just helped provide a little boost, just like how TechCrunch provided me with a boost.

    And once more people get to know you, you’ll naturally do better on the social web.

    For example, when Will Smith created his Instagram account, he didn’t have to buy ads or anything. Everyone just knows him already and that’s why his Instagram account blew up really quickly.

    And you can do what Will Smith did on a smaller scale. Similar to what I did.

    But don’t expect it overnight. Will Smith has been on television for over 20 years. It’s multiple shows, movies, and connections with other famous people that have really helped grow Will’s brand.

    Of course, we won’t get on TV as Will has, but you can piggyback on other popular brands multiple times to create a similar (smaller) effect.

    All you have to do is help these influencers out for free.

    If you are a web designer, offer design services. If you are a marketer, offer marketing services. If you are selling a product or service, keep giving it away for free and maybe someone will talk about your company.

    If you don’t have anything you can offer that has value, just look at whatever influencer you want to associate with, see where they may need help, learn that skill, and offer it for free.

    It’s the easiest way to become popular on the social web.

    Conclusion

    That’s my secret to being popular on the social web.

    It’s also how I built a decent size company… purely by leveraging other popular brands in the early days.

    You can do the same, but you have to be patient. Don’t expect it to happen overnight.

    For example, Eric’s brand has been growing but we have been doing a podcast together for over 2 years now.

    Plus, he continually pushes on his own and doesn’t just rely on leveraging other influencers.

    Remember, nothing worthwhile happens overnight.

    You have to be persistent with your emails, your direct messages, your text messages, and whatever else you can do to get a hold of these influencers. Most will ignore you but it is a numbers game and, eventually, you’ll be able to associate your brand with someone popular, which will grow your brand.

    And last but not least: Don’t expect an influencer to make you successful. Sure, multiple influencers are better than one, but that’s not what I meant.

    If Brian Dean from Backlinko wasn’t good at link building, creating content, SEO, and educating, he wouldn’t do well… no matter who he associated himself with. The same goes for Eric.

    Your skills, your abilities, your product… whatever you are trying to brand needs to stand on its own.

    So, what do you think about my secret? Are you going to copy it?

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